Mixology Monday cocktail: North of 7 Rhubarbian

 
I have been on vacation and neglecting this blog, but it is Mixology Monday time again,  and the theme this month has inspired me to get out and about in my own city. The theme is “hometown hooch” and was set by Stuart Putney of the Putney Farm blog:

One of the best recent developments in the world of cocktails and spirits is the reemergence of regional, craft distillers. And we say “reemergence” because 100+ years ago, before the twin scourges of Prohibition and virtual monopolization “industrialization,” distilling was often a truly local endeavor. Not so long ago, if you wanted some booze, it was often made in your neighborhood and for the tastes of the locals. Sadly, for a few generations, that wasn’t the case… But, quite happily, those days are back… There are literally hundreds of local and regional distillers making some seriously tasty spirits… and now is the time for our monthly online cocktail party to send them some love.

Your quest is simple. Create a new cocktail, or refashion a classic, using your favorite “hometown hooch” (and we can expand the definition of “hooch” to include spirits, liqueurs, aperitifs and beer)… A little local flavor or history on your “hometown hooch” is very welcome.

Now, not very long ago this would have consigned me to a beer-based drink, but luckily, a distillery opened in Ottawa in 2013. Thanks to MXMO I paid a visit to North of 7 this week. Located in a very unprepossessing strip mall, North of 7 may be a no nonsense enterprise but is no industrial hooch factory. Co-owner and head distiller Greg Lipin explained that they wanted to create some good local spirits, affordably and without hype. Inspired by rock-climbing trips to Kentucky, he and partner Jody Miall make vodka, gin, rum, and have a bourbon-profile Canadian whisky in cask that they expect to be ready in 1 1/2 years. The name of the distillery is inspired by where Greg’s cottage in located, near Calabogie north of highway 7, west of Ottawa. I asked about the name of their Illuminati vodka, which is the basis of their juniper-forward gin, and he revealed that it is popular with local “secret” societies. But my interest was mainly with their Triple-Beam gin, named after the scale they use to weight the botanicals, which are locally sourced to the extent possible (we are sadly short of local black pepper!)

  
And so to the cocktail. Even more local than the hooch is my back garden, where I have a bumper crop of rhubarb. I made a rhubarb syrup this week as well, and decided to do a gin-based cocktail to celebrate late spring. The intense botanicals of the Triple Beam work well here; since the only place this gin is currently available is at the distillery, you can substitute another juniper-heavy gin.

  • 1 1/2 oz Triple Beam gin
  • 1 oz rhubarb syrup (recipe here)
  • 1/2 oz Lillet Blanc
  • 1/2 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice

Shake ingredients well over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Here is the round-up of local hootch cocktails!

Mixology Monday
 
 

Victoriana Cocktail

It is Mixology Monday again and for a change I am not weeks early. It is Victoria Day weekend here in Canada. The theme for this MXMO is “I’ll take Manhattan.” I well remember my first Manhattan. My college roommate had a part time resto job and came home all enthusiastic about them. We had cheap whisky, cheap vermouth – I didn’t like it at all. But since my taste buds have refined somewhat with age, it has become a favourite.

Still – how to reconcile such an American theme with Victoria Day? Well, the only way I can – with a typically Canadian compromise.

Victoriana Cocktail

  • 2 oz Dark Horse whisky
  • 1/2 oz Dolin sweet vermouth
  • 1/2 oz Pimm’s #1 cup
  • 1/4 oz black currant simple syrup
  • Few dashes Dillons DSB bitters

Stir in an ice-filled shaker until frosty and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Rule Britannia! Or maybe I should say Cool Britannia!

Here is the wrap-up of all the fabulous Manhattans!

Please visit the web site of our convivial compère, Frederic

Mixology Monday

On Some Faraway Beach (improved cocktail)

  

  

In September 2012 I created this drink in honour of Blair’s show of new paintings, and for the Brian Eno tune that inspired the name of the series. I was not really satisfied with it at the time, though, because the drizzled colours sank quickly and the pretty painting effect was lost. However, thanks to the Mixology Talk podcast, I realized that egg whites could save the day. Chris of A Bar Above tested powdered egg white in cocktails and reported they are a good substitute, so if you are concerned about salmonella that is a fine way to go. If you are using powdered egg white (needs to be pure powdered egg white, not meringue powder), reconstitute it prior to using (2 tsp egg white powder in 1 oz water = one egg white). The egg white gives the drink a silky mouthfeel, plus it lets you enjoy the abstract image right to the bottom of the glass.

  • 1 oz Sailor Jerry’s spiced rum
  • 1 oz mango nectar
  • 1/2 oz passionfruit juice
  • 1/2 oz Lillet Blanc
  • 5 drops Peychaud’s bitters
  • 1 egg white or reconstituted equivalent

Pour ingredients into a shaker without ice and dry shake to incorporate well. Add ice to the shaker and shake until the outside is frosty. Pour into a cocktail glass, then drizzle with 1/2 tsp Blue Curacao and 1/2 tsp real pomegranate grenadine in an abstract pattern.

Grenadine is easy to make at home; the colour and flavour are far more intense than the Roses brand you commonly see in stores. Here is a video on how to make it.

Death and Taxes Cocktail

  

In Canada the tax deadline is April 30, and I did mine today. Thus this drink, which is a variation on a cocktail called The Taxman. I added the other “certainty” in the form of Death’s Door gin.

  • 2 oz Death’s Door gin
  • 2 oz sour cherry juice (jus de griottes)
  • 1/4 oz dry vermouth
  • 1/4 oz sweet vermouth
  • 1/8 oz blood orange bitters

Mixology Monday: Purple Prophet Cocktail

  


 I studied chemistry years ago. Many years ago. Two years into a chemistry degree I realized I was really crap at it. And I hated washing the graduate students’ labware. I switched to an arts major, but not before I attended a party or three that featured the classic science undergrad “cocktail,” the Purple Jesus, made with ethyl alcohol purloined by various conspirators from Dalhousie University chem labs in the week leading up to the party. The shame! 

Anyway, the Mixology Monday theme this month brought all of those long-buried memories rushing to the fore. Fellow Ontarian Whitney of the Tipicular Fixin’s blog, darn her, chose as the theme the “Drink of Shame.” 

We all made questionable drink choices in our past, the popular drinks from 1970 to the year 2000 were a cheap, sugary mess. Now is the time to resurrect your favourite drink from the time before modern Mixology. Give a new life to the drink… maybe you need to use fresh ingredients, or you can try elevating the spirits. Make everything from scratch or remove an offending ingredient. Do whatever you can to bring back and legitimize a drink you used to love.

Well, I can’t really say I loved the Purple Jesus of my chem lab days, but darn it, I am NOT ashamed of drinking Long Island Ice Teas, Tom Collinses (even made with powdered bar lime) or rye and gingers, so this is it. The drink that haunts my (admittedly fairly vague) memories of navigating the streets of Halifax in the wee hours, from various frat houses to my Fenwick Towers residence apartment, with an unladylike swagger. To make it vaguely acceptable I dumped the ethyl alcohol for a rather nice gin, and dumped the ginger ale and grape juice for a black cherry soda, added lemon juice to cut through the sweetness and blue curaçao because, well, it would not have been purple enough otherwise. And I put it in a wine glass, because I am a grown-up, dammit.

  • 2 oz Death’s Door gin
  • 1/4 oz blue curaçao
  • 1 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice, fine strained
  • Black cherry cream soda

Shake the gin, blue curaçao and lemon juice well over ice and strain into an ice-filled wine glass. Top with black cherry cream soda (I used Saranac, but be warned, it is very sweet, so you may choose to increase the lemon juice, cut it with club soda, or find a less sweet option). Lightly stir to blend. Drink without shame. Note: you will still need to wash your glassware in the morning.

Here is the round-up of despicable drinks ameliorated!
Tipicular Fixins
Mixology Monday

Kiwi Ghost cocktail



I choose to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by avoiding green beer and enjoying a decidedly green cocktail. This is a variation on a Green Ghost, incorporating kiwi fruit. 

  • Kiwi fruit
  • 1/4 oz lime juice
  • 2 oz gin
  • 1/4 oz green chartreuse 
  • 1/4 oz Cointreau

Muddle the pulp and juice of a kiwi fruit with 1/4 oz lime juice. Add ice to the shaker and then add the gin, chartreuse and Cointreau. Shake until the tin is frosty. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with kiwi berries, if you can find them. They are delicious!

Alta Vista Old Fashioned

Call me old fashioned!

It’s Mixology Monday time again and, as usual, I can’t wait for the deadline to experiment with the theme. This month we were challenged by Laura of Sass & Gin to come up with a newfangled Old Fashioned:

The Old Fashioned is the original “cock tail,” dating to the early 1800′s. In this humble bartender’s opinion, it is the pater familias of all other drinks, and it has taken its place as such in the recent cocktail revival. We have seen many variations of the Old Fashioned (i.e. Mayahuel’s Oaxaca Old Fashioned, PDT’s Benton’s Old Fashioned) and the resurgence of similar cocktails (i.e. the Sazerac). The bitters market has exploded over the last decade, with more flavor profiles than ever before, and with a more health-conscious public, your local grocery store is likely to carry a selection of sugars to play with (agave, coconut sugar, turbinado, etc). So, here’s the challenge: We will be sticking to the traditional ratios of spirit, bitters and sugar, but I’m challenging you to step outside the box with your selections. In addition, how will it be chilled or garnished? Do you want to add a secondary spirit or rinse? Go to town!

I had previously made a blood orange old fashioned and since it is still blood orange season, my thoughts drifted that way again. But things took a bit of an odd turn when I found finger limes in a produce store today. These small, not terribly attractive fruits, when cut in two and squeezed, produce tiny pearls (juice vesicles) that pack a big tart citrus wallop when you bite into them. So I decided to add a bit of lime juice and to throw in the pearls for good measure. So basically this is a riff on a Canadian old fashioned, which uses Canadian whisky, a triple sec and lemon juice.

So here we go:

  • Sugar cube
  • Dillon’s Bitter Lemon bitters
  • Blood orange slice
  • Maraschino cherry
  • 2 oz Canadian whisky
  • 1/4 oz Cointreau or triple sec
  • 1 teaspoon lime juice
  • Optional: finger lime pearls

In a chilled old fashioned glass, soak the sugar cube in the bitters and muddle with the blood orange slice and maraschino cherry.  Fill glass with ice cubes and add the whisky, Cointreau, lime juice and finger lime pearls if using. Stir well.

Note that the finger lime pearls will sink to the bottom; when you encounter one, bite it to release its flavour.

The round-up of old fashioneds!

Mixology Monday

Sass & Gin

Mortal Coil Cocktail

IMG_0593
The LCBO is stocking Death’s Door gin at the moment, and it is blood orange season. What else can I say?

2 oz blood orange juice, fine strained
1 1/2 oz Death’s Door gin
Generous splash of Peychaud’s bitters

Shake well with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Watch a really gory episode of Being Human or other macabre show of your choice.